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Double Eagle Gold Coins

December 17, 2009 – Double Eagle gold coins were entitled as such because the largest face value on any previously existing US coin until the time of the 1849 California gold rush was $10. The $10 Gold Eagle coins were minted with approximately ½ troy ounce of American gold. When Congress authorized the one-ounce, $20 gold pieces, it fittingly became known as the “Double Eagle.”

Double Eagle gold coins have always represented a significant amount of value. At the time of their minting, $20 gold coins were worth more than the average American’s weekly paycheck. It’s no surprise, then, that our government wanted these coins so badly in 1933, that they confiscated millions of them from US citizens.

There are only a limited number of Double Eagle gold coins in existence today, because the vast majority of these would-be American rarities were melted down by our government to force Americans to utilize the greenback as currency. As a matter of fact, Americans were prohibited from hoarding gold bullion until the 1970s because our greedy government wanted the ore so badly. Each Double Eagle coin that was minted from 1849 to 1933 contains .9675 ounces of pure gold, and the numismatic value of “Uncirculated Mint State” versions of these coins allows them the classification as completely private investments.

If you would like to protect a portion of your wealth in gold, if you plan to hold this gold longer than 14 months, and if you would like financial independence in the event of a US dollar collapse and/or another bullion confiscation, contact GoldCoin.net to learn more about these coins or register below for free information. If you feel comfortable with gold investing, do a simple Google search for a reputable gold exchange, and claim your position in the gold market today. 

Kevin Johnson

Senior Staff Writer – GoldCoin.net

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